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Energy Newsbriefs Blog

This current awareness service is prepared by the WSU Energy Program Library with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy State Energy Program. This information is provided for energy professionals and interested members of the public to highlight recent energy-related news, articles, and reports that discuss energy efficiency, energy conservation, and renewable sources of energy in engineering and policy circles.

 

Category: HVAC/R

HVAC/R


Duct Dynasty: Residential Duct-leakage Testing

Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration News, June 15, 2015, by David Richardson.
http://www.achrnews.com/articles/129855-duct-dynasty-residential-duct-leakage-testing

"HVAC professionals across the country are experiencing a recent change that is driven by energy codes. This change is related to duct-leakage testing on new and often retrofitted HVAC systems."

DOAS Gaining Traction in US [Dedicated Outdoor Air Systems]

Air conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration News, June 15, 2015, by Jen Anesi.
http://www.achrnews.com/articles/129852-doas-gaining-traction-in-us

"Commercial building codes are mandating higher volumes of fresh-air intake than ever before. To help meet these ventilation requirements, more and more HVAC contractors and building owners are turning to dedicated outdoor air systems (DOAS). These systems most often run in parallel with other systems to deliver 100 percent outdoor air and handle latent loads. The units improve occupant health and comfort, and they are quickly gaining popularity in the U.S."

So, You Have A Boiler System

Engineered Systems, June 2015, by Marcia Karr.
http://digital.bnpmedia.com/publication/?i=259699&p=32

"Whether it takes the form of low-cost adjustments and calibration, targeted replacements within the system, or a more substantial retrofit project when large equipment has run its course, you almost always have a good move available to conserve energy and expense. Boiler retrofits can reduce operating costs, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and provide better reliability.  The primary focus of a boiler retrofit is to accomplish these goals without compromising comfort, safety, or quality. This article provides recommendations about three types of retrofits."

Safety and Energy-Saving Resulting from Early Detection and Prevention of Leakage of Low-Flammable Refrigerants

IEA Heat Pump Centre Newsletter, #33 2015, by Masahide Sumi. [Open PDF then scroll or jump to page 22.
http://etkhpcorder.extweb.sp.se/ViewDocument.aspx?RapportId=1267

"Leakage of refrigerants represents a high cost in terms of the energy required in refrigeration and air conditioning devices. As it is expected that low-flammable refrigerants will be used in many devices in the future, this issue can be very important for the global environment, energy saving and safety. The following article describes detection systems which can easily detect and identify leakage at an early stage, and a method which can easily prevent leakage from plumbing and joints of air conditioning equipment."

Fan-Efficiency Metrics

HPAC Engineering, May 2015, by Dustin Meredith and Jeanne Harshaw.
http://hpac.com/iaq-ventilation/fan-efficiency-metrics

"Air Movement and Control Association (AMCA) International estimates fans account for 30 to 40 percent of commercial-building HVAC energy consumption. Improving fan efficiency, therefore, is an important step toward reducing global, overall energy use."

Over 50% Energy Savings Realized for Naval Air Station Facility on Whidbey Island

Northwest Energy Efficiency Council (NEEC) News, May 26, 2015.
http://www.neec.net/news/over-50-energy-savings-realized-naval-air-station-facility-whidbey-island

"The Naval Air Station (NAS) on Whidbey Island believes that national defense and environmental protection must be compatible goals. Their recent effort to develop and execute a targeted plan for upgrading the chilled water system serving their critical Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) facility is another great example of the commitment the NAS has for environmental stewardship and continual improvement."

VRF with Heat Recovery Ventilation In Pre K-12 Schools

Engineered Systems, May 2015, by Robert G. Thompson.
http://www.esmagazine.com/articles/97144-vrf-with-heat-recovery-ventilation-in-pre-k-12-schools

"As the learning curve for VRF continues, it’s only fitting to see how it can fare in a familiar learning environment. Turns out it can play a key role in the critical lesson of adapting to existing spaces and occupancy needs when crafting the optimum retrofit design for a given client."

High School LEEDership

Engineered Systems, May 2015, by Jeffrey Seewald and Corinne Wichser.
http://www.esmagazine.com/articles/97142-high-school-leedership

"Spurred by student initiative, this Minnesota magnet school has become the host for a unique collaboration focused on auditing and improving its mechanical and environmental performance. See how the partnership has gotten off to a solid start in conducting what is far from your average extra credit assignment."

Methods of Calculating Water Recovery From Air-Conditioning Cooling Coils, Part 2 of 2

HPAC Engineering, May 2015, by William G. Acker.
http://hpac.com/air-conditioning/methods-calculating-water-recovery-air-conditioning-cooling-coils-part-2-2

"Last month, in Part 1 of this article, we evaluated four equations used to determine the amount of water vapor removed from cooling coils in condensate-recovery applications. The accuracy of those equations varies, as some calculate only the removal of water vapor entering with the outside-air intake. This month, we will discuss more-accurate methods of calculating water-vapor removal and calculating the removal of all water-vapor loads by a cooling coil."

Methods of Calculating Water Recovery From Air-Conditioning Cooling Coils, Part 1 of 2

HPAC Engineering, Apr. 2015, by William G. Acker.
http://hpac.com/air-conditioning/methods-calculating-water-recovery-air-conditioning-cooling-coils-part-1-2

"In traditional building cooling, air passes through chilled cooling coils in air-handling units prior to entering a facility. As air passes over the coils, moisture in the air condenses into water on the coils. The water drips into a collection pan below and is sent to a sewer drain. Today, however, particularly in areas where water is scarce and rates are high, many building owners are collecting this water and using it to replenish cooling towers for irrigation and other uses."

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The Energy Newsbriefs Blog is a continuation of the weekly Energy Newsbriefs. Please bookmark this site and return frequently. Although we will not be accepting comments from within the Blog, we would be happy to hear from you by email at library@energy.wsu.edu