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Energy Newsbriefs Blog

This current awareness service is prepared by the WSU Energy Program Library with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy State Energy Program. This information is provided for energy professionals and interested members of the public to highlight recent energy-related news, articles, and reports that discuss energy efficiency, energy conservation, and renewable sources of energy in engineering and policy circles.


Category: Financing


Green Financing Programs for Multifamily Take Off

EcoBuilding Pulse/Apartment Finance Today, Oct. 3, 2016, by Jerry Ascierto.

"Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) want to make it easier, and more cost effective, for multifamily owners to go green."

Expanding the Energy Efficiency Toolbox Through Green Banks

ACEEE, Sept. 7, 2016, by Annie Gilleo.

"In a new report from ACEEE, we review the progress of six green banks and four additional financing entities that serve similar functions. Our goals were to understand how green banks are working in specific market sectors and to identify promising strategies and lessons learned, with a particular focus on energy efficiency. If more states are looking to green banks to stretch public dollars, fill market gaps, and ramp up clean energy investment, we want to know how the early results and lessons learned can shape the next round of green bank deployment."

Lending for Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Low- to Moderate-Income Communities: Bank of America’s Energy Efficiency Finance Program

ACEEE, July 28, 2016, by James Barrett and Brian Stickles .

"In 2011, Bank of America launched its Energy Efficiency Finance Program (EEFP) to help families, businesses, and multifamily building owners in low- to moderate-income (LMI) communities increase their energy efficiency and reduce their energy bills.... Under a contract with Bank of America to evaluate this program, we [ACEEE] analyzed data supplied by the participating CDFIs and Bright Power to assess the performance of the loan portfolios as well as the efficiency investments themselves. In general, we found that the loans are performing well. "

Is PACE Moving to Prime Time?

ACEEE, Jul 18, 2016, by Jim Barrett.

"One of the distinctions we often make between energy and energy efficiency is that energy acts more like a cost, and energy efficiency acts more like an investment. Like most investments, energy efficiency works by using an up front expense to generate a stream of economic benefits.... Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is a relatively new strategy for funding efficiency and renewable investments that is really starting to take off."

Energy Efficiency Program Financing: Where It Comes From, Where It Goes, and How It Gets There

Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, June 2016, by Jeff Deason, Greg Leventis, Charles A. Goldman, and Juan Pablo Carvallo.

"In this technical brief we characterize the programmatic energy efficiency financing market from a quantitative perspective. Financing in this report refers to provision of capital—which is paid back over time—to cover up-front costs of energy efficiency. It does not refer to rebates and other types of incentives." 


Don’t Skip the Most Important Meeting of Your Energy Project

Compressed Air Best Practices, May 2016, by John Molnar.

"A meeting between the auditor, incenting organization, vendor, and end user can help maximize the benefits of any energy-saving project."

Residential Energy+ Finance the Future [Home Energy Upgrades]

Rocky Mountain Institute Insight Brief, Jan. 2016.

"Home energy upgrades can disproportionately benefit very low-, low-, and moderate-income homeowners, ensuring their improved physical and financial health as well as improved stability in the broader financial markets. This paper explores the financial benefits of home energy upgrades and seeks to identify opportunities—such as the Federal Housing Finance Authority’s Duty to Serve rule—to link greater market access and transparency around home energy performance with improved financial health for homeowners and mortgage markets overall."

Making it Count: Understanding the Value of Energy Efficiency Financing Programs Funded by Utility Customers

SEE Action, Dec. 10, 2015.

"In some jurisdictions, policy makers are considering large-scale financing programs that use utility customer funds to attract larger amounts of private capital. In some cases, these strategies support a goal to shift away from traditional energy efficiency program strategies (such as rebates and technical assistance and audits) and toward financing over time."

Deep Energy Retrofits Using Energy Savings Performance Contracts: Success Stories

Rocky Mountain Institute, Aug. 2015.

"Energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) have become a key mechanism for energy efficiency upgrades in recent years, with the federal market now exceeding $1 billion in gross annual revenue. ESPCs allow federal agencies to partner with an energy service company (ESCO) in order to complete energy savings projects without upfront capital costs or Congressional appropriations. This report showcases eight case studies that highlight best practices in federal ESPCs. Highlighted projects—including seven federal and one municipal project—cumulatively exceed 600 billion BTUs in energy savings, with an average 58% energy use reduction."

Five Considerations for Choosing the Best Energy Efficiency Financing [Facilities]

Building Operating Management, June 2015, by Charlotte Kim.

An article in 5-parts:
Part 1: Finding Best Financing Options for Energy Efficiency Projects
Part 2: ‘Threshold Questions’ Help Find Path to Energy Efficiency Financing
Part 3: Financing Tools Include Energy Performance Contract, Energy Service Agreement Part
4: Utility On-bill Financing an Added Option for Energy Efficiency Projects
Part 5: PACE Financing an Option for More Extensive Energy Efficiency Projects
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